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The History of Black Music In America Part. 5

HISTORY OF

Black Music in America

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Part 2
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Part 4
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Part 5

OUR MISSION

TO EDUCATE AND INSPIRE INDIVIDUALS BY PRESERVING AND CELEBRATING THE VARIOUS MUSIC GENRES THAT HAVE BEEN CREATED, INFLUENCED AND INSPIRED BY BLACK PEOPLE.

MUSIC

MUSIC

OUR PROMISE

TO VIRTUALLY OFFER EXHIBITS AND EXPERIENCES THAT EDUCATE INDIVIDUALS AND SERVE AS A SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HUB FOR VARIOUS COMMUNITIES.

Video Archives

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The Untold Story of Joseph BologneJackie Wilson 20/20 Interview Pt. 1
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The Untold Story of Joseph Bolognethe Prodigy known as "Black Mozart"
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Oral HistoriesFrom Segregated Greenwood, MS in the 1960s
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Oral HistoriesFrom Segregated Greenwood, MS in the 1960s
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Soundies:Black Music From the 1940s
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Black Slaves, Red MastersPart 1
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Black Slaves, Red MastersPart 2
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The Story of the BluesPart 3
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The Jim Crow Museum
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Traveling with the Green Bookduring the Jim Crow era
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The Story ofthe First Rock n Roll Song
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Slave Songbook:Origin of the Negro Spiritual

MUSIC HISTORY BY STATE


The Near East Side of Columbus was once known as Bronzeville. It was the first free community for African Americans in Ohio.

http://ohiohistorycentral.org


More slaves sought freedom by coming through Ohio than by any other state.


A Mighty Long Way: How Black People Moved In & Out and Around Detroit

By: Jamon Jordan

In 1903, an auto company founded by James Packard opened a 10,000 square ft facility on the east side of Detroit. The Packard Plant would grow to be one of the largest factories in US history. That same year, another man named Henry Ford would form the Ford Motor Company, and within a few years would begin selling the Model T. For over a century, Detroit has been on the move, and has put the world on the move. Detroit became the Motor City and changed not only this city, but fundamentally transformed cities around the world. But as much as Detroit changed the world, African Americans changed Detroit. Henry Ford, James Packard and the auto industry may have turned Detroit from making cigars, stoves and railroad boxcars into building automobiles. But African Americans made Detroit a center for Black progress in civil rights, business and entertainment.

Black people have lived in what is now Detroit for hundreds of years. The earliest written record of a Black person in Detroit is the 1736 notation of an “unknown negresse” who was enslaved and buried on the grounds of Saint Anne de Detroit, which was originally a simple chapel within Fort Ponchartrain du Detroit. Fort Ponchartrain, later known as Fort Detroit, was the fort built by Frenchman Antoine Laumet de la Mothe, sieur de Cadillac and the others who arrived with him in 1701. The purpose of the fort was to facilitate Cadillac’s monopoly of the fur trade. But the French were knee-deep in another trade, the slave trade. Within 100 years of that earliest record of an enslaved Black woman, Black people in Detroit would literally engage in war against the institution of slavery, and they would win.


Because of its social stance as an anti-slavery state, Ohio was a destination for a number of escaped slaves before the Civil War. As early as the 1870s, members of the Society of Friends (a Peace Church within the Quaker faith) actively assisted former slaves in their search for freedom. Ohio was important in the operation of the Underground Railroad. While some escaped slaves passed through Ohio on the way to Canada, a large number settled in Ohio, particularly in growing cities like Cleveland and Cincinnati. By 1860, almost 37,000 African-Americans lived in Ohio.



OHIO

The Near East Side of Columbus was once known as Bronzeville. It was the first free community for African Americans in Ohio.

http://ohiohistorycentral.org


More slaves sought freedom by coming through Ohio than by any other state.


A Mighty Long Way: How Black People Moved In & Out and Around Detroit

By: Jamon Jordan

In 1903, an auto company founded by James Packard opened a 10,000 square ft facility on the east side of Detroit. The Packard Plant would grow to be one of the largest factories in US history. That same year, another man named Henry Ford would form the Ford Motor Company, and within a few years would begin selling the Model T. For over a century, Detroit has been on the move, and has put the world on the move. Detroit became the Motor City and changed not only this city, but fundamentally transformed cities around the world. But as much as Detroit changed the world, African Americans changed Detroit. Henry Ford, James Packard and the auto industry may have turned Detroit from making cigars, stoves and railroad boxcars into building automobiles. But African Americans made Detroit a center for Black progress in civil rights, business and entertainment.

Black people have lived in what is now Detroit for hundreds of years. The earliest written record of a Black person in Detroit is the 1736 notation of an “unknown negresse” who was enslaved and buried on the grounds of Saint Anne de Detroit, which was originally a simple chapel within Fort Ponchartrain du Detroit. Fort Ponchartrain, later known as Fort Detroit, was the fort built by Frenchman Antoine Laumet de la Mothe, sieur de Cadillac and the others who arrived with him in 1701. The purpose of the fort was to facilitate Cadillac’s monopoly of the fur trade. But the French were knee-deep in another trade, the slave trade. Within 100 years of that earliest record of an enslaved Black woman, Black people in Detroit would literally engage in war against the institution of slavery, and they would win.


https://ohiohistorycentral.org/index.php?title=African_Americans&mobileaction=toggle_view_desktop


Because of its social stance as an anti-slavery state, Ohio was a destination for a number of escaped slaves before the Civil War. As early as the 1870s, members of the Society of Friends (a Peace Church within the Quaker faith) actively assisted former slaves in their search for freedom. Ohio was important in the operation of the Underground Railroad. While some escaped slaves passed through Ohio on the way to Canada, a large number settled in Ohio, particularly in growing cities like Cleveland and Cincinnati. By 1860, almost 37,000 African-Americans lived in Ohio.



https://case.edu/ech/articles/b/ben


1957 HITS ARCHIVE: Raunchy - Ernie Freeman

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLOyVq6vXI4


Jimmy Scott

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_Scott



FIRST BLACKS IN CALIFORNIA


People of African-descent first appeared in California from Mexico due to the Spanish Conquest. The Spaniards imported African slaves to California. There was many mulattos in Alta California. Spanish soldiers, priests, and settlers brought black slaves and free blacks into the state in the eighteenth century. African Americans arrived in California by 1860 in search of gold during the California Gold Rush. White southerners brought black slaves into the California mines in 1849. White slave owners and their black slaves primarily from Texas, Mississippi, Missouri, and Arkansas. The first census recorded of African Americans in California appeared in 1850 with 962 people and 1860 with 4,086 people. Then, in 1910 the number rose to 22,000. African Americans migrated to the North from the Southern United States to escape Jim Crow in between 1940 and 1970. They also migrated to the state for better job opportunities.[36] African Americans totaled to less than one percent of California's population before the Second World War. The population of African Americans grew slowly with other minorities in California, with only 21,645 African American residents in 1910 compared to two million white residents. Post-WWII, African Americans boosted their population enormously in California. African Americans migrated to California from Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas to work in the defense industry. In the 2010s, California was a net loser of black migration for the first time in three decades. Most exiting California blacks are returning to the south especially Texas and the Atlanta metropolitan area. There are Black neighborhoods and cities with Black populations surpassing 15% in Southern California like in Compton, South Los Angeles and Inglewood, and in Northern California like Stockton, Oakland, and Vallejo.

Oakland has been noted for being a center of Northern California's Black population, with it being at least 25% Black as of 2020. Many African Americans who settled in California, likewise in Oakland, worked on the railroad in Oakland and East Bay areas in the early-to-mid 1900s. Anti-black hate crimes in California has increased.


CALIFORNIA

FIRST BLACKS IN CALIFORNIA


People of African-descent first appeared in California from Mexico due to the Spanish Conquest. The Spaniards imported African slaves to California. There was many mulattos in Alta California. Spanish soldiers, priests, and settlers brought black slaves and free blacks into the state in the eighteenth century. African Americans arrived in California by 1860 in search of gold during the California Gold Rush. White southerners brought black slaves into the California mines in 1849. White slave owners and their black slaves primarily from Texas, Mississippi, Missouri, and Arkansas. The first census recorded of African Americans in California appeared in 1850 with 962 people and 1860 with 4,086 people. Then, in 1910 the number rose to 22,000. African Americans migrated to the North from the Southern United States to escape Jim Crow in between 1940 and 1970. They also migrated to the state for better job opportunities.[36] African Americans totaled to less than one percent of California's population before the Second World War. The population of African Americans grew slowly with other minorities in California, with only 21,645 African American residents in 1910 compared to two million white residents. Post-WWII, African Americans boosted their population enormously in California. African Americans migrated to California from Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas to work in the defense industry. In the 2010s, California was a net loser of black migration for the first time in three decades. Most exiting California blacks are returning to the south especially Texas and the Atlanta metropolitan area. There are Black neighborhoods and cities with Black populations surpassing 15% in Southern California like in Compton, South Los Angeles and Inglewood, and in Northern California like Stockton, Oakland, and Vallejo.

Oakland has been noted for being a center of Northern California's Black population, with it being at least 25% Black as of 2020. Many African Americans who settled in California, likewise in Oakland, worked on the railroad in Oakland and East Bay areas in the early-to-mid 1900s. Anti-black hate crimes in California has increased.


The Wheatt Foundation is establishing the Museum of Black Music. It will be virtual online. It will trace the origins of Blacks coming from Africa to various parts of the world, starting with Cleveland, Ohio. Part of the content for each city will include:

 

How Blacks got to the city, where they lived, went to school, worshiped, and went for entertainment.

Black music performers and contributors to various genres of music will be identified who resided in the various cities. The museum will start with Cleveland then delve into other cities within Ohio then to other cities within the U.S. and then to cities abroad. The museum will be free to the public worldwide.

MUSEUM OF BLACK MUSIC


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